SHARE YOUR WORLD – 2015 WEEK #16

Share your world!
Share your world!

What are your favorite spices?
Cinnamon & nutmeg.  Growing up on the island of Grenada these spices that are grown locally continue to be a staple in my life.  See my post here about Nutmeg & Grenada.

 

What object do you always have with you when traveling and why?Whistle
My shepherd’s whistle.  I have it with me at all times because my dogs are trained to respond to it.  Mostly to come or come quickly.  I wear my whistle 24 hours a day because I don’t ever want to be without it when it is most needed as in dogs coming!

 

What is one thing you love about being an adult?
I suppose tonight, watching parts of the White House Correspondent’s Dinner -I’m grateful to be able to understand the jokes and be able to laugh.  By the same token I sometimes wish I didn’t understand.

What item, that you don’t have already, would you most like to own?
I would like to own a home not to live in.  I love living on my boat but a home that could be rented out as a source of additional income for my retirement would be good.

 

Coup d’état -School Cancelled (13Mar, 1979) – Grenada, W.I.

March 13th 1979 …This was the day of the bloodless Coup that took place in Grenada, West Indies.    I will tell you about my day that day -or just a small portion of it.

My brother and I walked to school everyday and March 13th was a Tuesday and we arrived at school right on time maybe even a little early to find only a handful of students and teachers there and a bit of a hush as the Headmistress and teachers talked in hushed tones.  Eventually we were informed that we needed to go back home because there would be no school for the day as there had been a Coup overnight.

We walked back home and told our parents that school had been cancelled because there had been a Coup.  They didn’t believe us and insisted that we go back to school.  We weren’t in the habit of lying to them but I guess this just seemed too unbelievable.  We finally convinced my dad to turn on the radio.

There was no TV back then and the only radio was from a few am radio stations that were local to the island.  Sure enough, the news confirmed our story.  My dad stayed home from work and we all listened to the radio and the news most of the day.

 

13 March 1979,
 Radio Free Grenada,
Maurice Bishop, Address to the Nation


Maurice BishopBrothers and Sisters,

  This is Maurice Bishop speaking.

  At 4.15 am this morning, the People’s Revolutionary Army seized   control of the army barracks at True Blue.

 The barracks were burned to the ground. After half-an-hour  struggle, the forces of Gairy’s army were completely defeated, and  surrendered.

Every single soldier surrendered, and not a single member of the  revolutionary forces was injured.

 At the same time, the radio station was captured without a shot  being fired. Shortly after this, several cabinet ministers were captured in their beds by units of the revolutionary army.

A number of senior police officers, including Superintendent Adonis Francis, were also taken into protective custody.

At this moment, several police stations have already put up the white flag of surrender.

Revolutionary forces have been dispatched to mop up any possible source of resistance or disloyalty to the new government. I am now calling upon the working people, the youths, workers, farmers, fishermen, middle-class people, and women to join our armed revolutionary forces at central positions in your communities and to give them any assistance which they call for.

Virtually all stations have surrendered. I repeat. We restress, resistance will be futile. don’t be misled by Bogo DeSouze or Cosmos Raymond into believing that there are any prospects of saving the dictator Gairy.   

Eric Gairy, apparently sensing that the end was near, yesterday fled the country, leaving orders for all opposition forces, including especially the people’s leader, to be massacred.

Before these orders could be followed, the people’s revolutionary Army was able to seize power. This people’s government will now be seeking Gairy’s extradition so that he may be put on trial to face charges, including the gross charges, the serious charges, of murder, fraud, and the trampling of the democratic rights of our people.

In closing, let me assure the people of Grenada that all democratic freedoms, including freedom of elections, religious and political opinion, will be fully restored to the people.

The personal safety and property of individuals will be protected. Foreign residents are quite safe and are welcome to remain in Grenada. And we look forward to continuing friendly relations with those countries with which we now have such relations.

Let me assure all supporters of the former Gairy government that they will not be injured in any way. Their homes, their families and their jobs are completely safe, so long as they do not offer violence to our government.

However, those who resist violently will be firmly dealt with. I am calling upon all the supporters of the former government to realize that Gairy has fled the country and to cooperate fully with our new government. You will not be victimized, we assure you.

People of Grenada, this revolution is for work, for food, for decent housing and health services, and for a bright future for our children and great grand-children. The benefits of the revolution will be given to everyone regardless of political opinion or which political party they support.

Let us all unite as one. All police stations are again reminded to surrender their arms to the people’s revolutionary forces.

We know Gairy will try to organize international assistance, but we advise that it will be an international criminal offence to assist the dictator, Gairy. This will amount to an intolerable interference in the internal affairs of our country and will be resisted by all patriotic Grenadians with every ounce of our strength.

I am appealing to all the people, gather at all central places all over the country, and prepare to welcome and assist the people’s armed forces when they come into your area. The revolution is expected to consolidate the position of power within the next few hours.

LONG LIVE THE PEOPLE OF GRENADA! LONG LIVE FREEDOM AND fwdDEMOCRACY! LET US TOGETHER BUILD A JUST GRENADA!” 

Independence Day 2015 & The Nutmeg

Nutmeg1 Is there anyone else out there that loves the smell of Nutmeg?

Today, the 7th of February, 2015 is the 41st anniversary of Grenada’s (greh-NAY-dah’s) Independence.

I grew up in the Spice Island of Grenada and  awakened this morning with a desire to write a little something about my home for today’s writing exercise. As I was thinking about a subject matter for my writing today, I made myself a cup of Chai Tea and then instinctively sprinkled a bit of Nutmeg on top. Doesn’t everyone do that?

I sipped on my tea, and smelled that wonderful and powerful aroma of the Nutmeg. Right then, I had a realisation.  Nutmeg is not a staple in most people’s diet and probably not a spice that most people would even think to add to their food or drink outside of perhaps, the Holiday Season.

Growing up in the Spice Island of Grenada,  Nutmeg was more than just a Holiday Tradition.  The aroma and taste of Nutmeg is something that melds with just about all foods as far as I am concerned!!  To be honest, I can live without salt or pepper but not without nutmeg and cinnamon!

Grenada attained its political independence from Britain in 1974 which meant having a new flag uniquely Grenadian.  The key element remaining on the new flag was the Nutmeg.  Nutmeg and tourism are the two main sources of revenue for Grenada so it is quite fitting that the Nutmeg dons our flag with honour.

Although from the sound of it’s name you might be inclined to consider the Nutmeg a nut, this is not the case.  The Nutmeg is in fact a fruit.  As the Nutmeg fruit ripens, it splits open while still on the tree, to reveal it’s seed.  Nutmeg the spice, is derived from the oval-shaped, lightly wrinkled dark brown seed of the Nutmeg fruit.  It is sold either whole or ground.  The best taste is derived from grinding the Nutmeg yourself when ready to use it.  This is not as practical as buying the already ground form of Nutmeg in the spice jar, but there is a definite enhancement of taste when you grind it yourself!

Covering the Nutmeg seed is a net-like bright red membrane which is in fact the Nutmeg’s twin spice, Mace.   The yellow outer body of the Nutmeg is the pericarp.  It is edible and used to make nutmeg jelly, syrup, and candy.  No part of the Nutmeg fruit is wasted in Grenada but the only parts really exported are the Mace and the Nutmeg seed.

I challenge you to consider integrating Nutmeg into your diet.  You will not be disappointed!  It really is not just for holidays and desserts.  Nutmeg is wonderful on sweet potatoes, pumpkin, cabbage, broccoli & spinach.  Add a bit of butter or coconut oil to awaken your taste-buds to a flavourful combination.  Sprinkle it on raw or cooked apples or bananas to name a few fruits or add it to the top of your fruit salad.  Nutmeg on your breakfast foods, scrambled eggs, pancakes or oatmeal is delectable.  Nutmeg is generally best as an additive sprinkled after cooking on food that is still warm or freshly baked.  Do consider adding a touch of Nutmeg to your diet and spread the word!!

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Indonesia and Grenada are the only two significant exporters of Nutmeg with Grenada holding about 20% of the market!